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Amanita Muscaria aka Fly Agaric

Amanita Muscaria aka Fly Agaric

The word “agaric” is an old and common misnomer that has been around for many centuries.

This term refers to a mushroom fungus fruiting body that is devoid of lamellae and is clearly distinguishable from the stipe.

In some cases, the word ‘agaric’ may refer to a basidiomycete species with an agarian-type fruiting body.

This fungus has a distinct, characteristic appearance, and the name is often used to describe the fungus.|agaric

Amanita Muscaria aka Fly Agaric

The word “agaric” is an old and common misnomer that has been around for many centuries. This term refers to a mushroom fungus fruiting body that is devoid of lamellae and is clearly distinguishable from the stipe.

In some cases, the word ‘agaric’ may refer to a basidiomycete species with an agrarian-type fruiting body. This fungus has a distinct, characteristic appearance, and the name is often used to describe the fungus.

Amanita mascara, aka fly agaric, is one of the most widely distributed fungi, and is most commonly found in pine and birch forests, although it can occur on other trees.

However, by the mid-19th century, this species had already established a wide distribution in the northern hemisphere, and was particularly abundant in northern Europe and North America. In the early 2000s, it was introduced to the Caribbean and Australia.

The history of agaric use in plants is fascinating, and has been attributed to Soma, a Vedic drug consumed by the Indo-Iranians.

In fact, the poisoning of fly agrarian is described as ‘atropine-like’ and manifests in symptoms between thirty minutes and two hours after ingestion. Symptoms include increased sensitivity to visual and auditory stimuli, hallucinations, and confusion.